Thursday, 31 May 2012

World War II Weekend, 2nd & 3rd June

Don't miss our fantastic World War II enactment weekend this Saturday and Sunday. There will be Second World War displays and enactments throughout the site - including Land Army girls, 1940s sweet shop, model aeroplanes display, Army and Paras camp, Soviet Field Hospital, French Resistance fighters, Naval Commandos, Home Guard, grenade throwing and landmine clearing (!) and more - plus new this year 1940s hairdressing and '40s singing and dance by Kirkham Henry Performing Arts School.


Friday, 25 May 2012

Living History Weekend May 26th - 27th

Live period demonstrations all this weekend at Ryedale Folk Museum with the No Name Group !

They will be covering more than one period of traditional ways of living and crafts over the weekend - drop in to travel back in time .....

This is a video of a previous encampment by the re-enactors at our Museum 
when they were living as Romans, Saxons and Vikings - 


The Dialect Questionnaire: The Results Part 3

This is the final post on the Dialect Questionnaire Project conducted by the University of Leeds in partnership with Ryedale Folk Museum.

158 respondents completed the questionnaire.

Scroll down to see the words that no one selected…

Would you have used any of the following words?

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...
No one selected: DROUGHTY or PADDOCKED

If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...
No one selected: CLAMMED OUT, PINED or WALLOW

What do you call something that you eat between meals?
No one selected: BAGGINGS, BITE OF TEN O'CLOCK, BITING-ON, MINNING-ON, CLOCKS, CROUST, DOWAN, FORENOON-DRINKINGS or PACKING

What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?
No one selected: THE HEADACHE

What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?
No one selected: SHIVE, SPLICE, SPOAL or STOB

What do you call any running water smaller than a river?
No one selected: SIKE


Scroll down to view the bar charts and see how many times each word was selected.

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...




The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is THIRSTY

The second most popular word selected is DRY

Would you have chosen THIRSTY or DRY? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What is left at the bottom of your teacup when you’ve finished drinking the tea?




The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is DREGS

The second most popular word selected is TEA-LEAVES

Would you have chosen DREGS or TEA-LEAVES? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...




The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is HUNGRY

The second most popular word selected is FAMISHED

Would you have chosen HUNGRY or FAMISHED? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What do you call something that you eat between meals?


The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is SNACK

The second most popular word selected is BIT OF A SNACK

Would you have chosen SNACK or BIT OF A SNACK? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?


The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is A HEADACHE

The second most popular word selected is A BAD HEAD

Would you have chosen A HEADACHE or A BAD HEAD? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?



The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is SPLINTER

The second most popular word selected is SPELL

Would you have chosen SPLINTER or SPELL? Or, would you have chosen a different word?



What do you call any running water smaller than a river?



The bar chart shows the most popular word selected is STREAM

The second most popular word selected is BECK

Would you have chosen STREAM or BECK? Or, would you have chosen a different word?


Which words did respondents choose to write in the 'other' category?

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...
Respondents wrote: PARCHED, GAGGING, GAGGED, GASPING, GEGGING,
CLEM, FAIR CLEMMED and SPITTING FEATHERS

What is left at the bottom of your teacup when you’ve finished drinking the tea?
Respondents wrote: LEFT-OVERS

If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...
Respondents wrote: STARVING, STARVED, EMPTY, STARVIN, CLEMT, CLEMPT,
FAIR CLEMMED, HANK MARVIN, PECKISH and RAVENOUS

What do you call something that you eat between meals?
Respondents wrote: PIECE, BITE TO EAT, MUNCHES, A NIBBLE

What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?
Respondents wrote: BANGING HEAD, MIGRAINE, A THUMPER, HEAD HURTS, HEAD FILL,
HEEDS BURSTIN, HIED'S THUMPING, NED HURTS, THUMPING HEAD AND YEDWARCH

What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?
Respondents wrote: BLINTER, SLIVER, and SPELT

What do you call any running water smaller than a river?
Respondents wrote: DYKE, DITCH, OKSE and RILL

Here's some information that you might find interesting about some of the words you chose to write in the 'other' category… 


PIECE was first recorded in 1619. It is most frequently associated with Scottish, Irish, and regional North English.

SLIVER originated from the verb "to slive" meaning "to split". It is most frequently associated with the region of Suffolk.

SPELT is thought to have originated from the verb "to spelt" which means "to split".
It is most frequently associated with Lincolnshire and Northamptonshire.

RILL was first recorded in 1552. It's origin is uncertain but it is perhaps related to words in Dutch or German.


References for the above information:
Oxford English Dictionary. 2012. Oxford University Press. Available from: http://www.oed.com/
Wright, Joseph. The English Dialect Dictionary. 1898-1905. London: Frowde.

Thank you very much to all the respondents who completed the Dialect Questionnaire Project.
I hope you've all enjoyed reading the results! And, perhaps learnt a word or two along the way!

Special thanks to those who made this project possible:
Kevin Simms, David Stockdale and Emma Colclough at Ryedale Folk Museum and Dr. Fiona Douglas at the University of Leeds.


The Dialect Questionnaire: The Results Part 2

So, the results are in!
158 respondents completed the Dialect Questionnaire Project between 27 March and 18 April 2012.
The Dialect Questionnaire is a project conducted by Ryedale Folk Museum and the School of English at the University of Leeds.

Scroll down to see a comparison between responses from 1955 and 2012 by respondents  associated with the southern area of the North York Moors in the North Riding of Yorkshire.

The 1955 responses come from the Survey of English Dialects.
The Survey has four data collection sites in this area: Helmsley, Easingwold, Borrowby and Bedale. See the map below.
The 2012 responses come for this dialect questionnaire project sited at Ryedale Folk Museum.


A comparison between the two sets of words can hint at the ways in which the usage of dialect words changes over time.
Words shown in green have been selected by the 2012 respondents but not by the 1955 respondents.
Words shown in red have been selected by the 1955 respondents but not by the 2012 respondents.

If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...     

2012 responses: THIRSTY, DRY, PARCHED UP or GAGGED
1955 responses: THIRSTY, DRY or PARCHED UP

What is left at the bottom of your teacup when you’ve finished drinking the tea?

2012 responses: DREGS or TEA-LEAVES
1955 responses: TEA-LEAVES or TEA-GROUNDS

If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...

2012 responses: FAMISHED or HUNGRY
1955 responses: HUNGRY or GANT

What do you call something that you eat between meals?

2012 responses: SNACK, BAIT, ELEVENSES, LOWANCE, TENSES, BIT OF A SNACK or SNAP
1955 responses: LOWANCE, TEN-O'CLOCKS, ELEVENSES or SNACK

What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?

2012 responses: HEADACHE, A BAD HEAD or A SORE HEAD
1955 responses: HEADWARK

What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?

2012 responses: SPLINTER, SPELL, SPEEL or SPELK
1955 responses: SPELL, SPELK or SPLINTER

What do you call any running water smaller than a river?
2012 responses: BECK, STREAM, BROOK, BURN, STELL or GILL
1955 responses: BECK, STREAM or STELL

A comparison between the two sets of words shows the ways in which the usage of dialect words changes over time.

If you come from the southern area of the North York Moors in the North Riding of Yorkshire:
Would you have used the 2012 words? Or, would you have the 1955 words? Or, would you have used different words altogether?

Coming next on Ryedale Folk Museum's blog: the results of the Dialect Questionnaire Project Part 3.
Part 3 is the final part of the Dialect Questionnaire Project. Don't miss it!

Thursday, 24 May 2012

The Dialect Questionnaire: The Results Part 1

So, the results are in!

158 respondents completed the Dialect Questionnaire Project between 27 March and 18 April 2012.

Who completed the Dialect Questionnaire?

What is your relationship to Ryedale Folk Museum?

The pie chart below shows that the majority of respondents are visitors to Ryedale Folk Museum.



Are you male or female?

The pie chart below shows that the majority of respondents are female.



How old are you?

The bar chart below shows that the majority of respondents are aged between 41 and 50 years old. 61 to 70 year olds come a close second.
And, children aged between 4 and 10 years old rank third.




Where do you come from?

The map below shows that visitors came from countires as far a field as Argentina, India, Turkey, Germany and Scotland.

The red areas of the map below show that visitors travelled from many different counties in England to visit Ryedale Folk Museum.



The majority of visitors, 52%, came from the county of Yorkshire to visit Ryedale Folk Museum.

Coming next on Ryedale Folk Museum's blog: the results of the Dialect Questionnaire Project: Part 2.

Wednesday, 23 May 2012

The Dialect Questionnaire: Responses from a Helmsley Resident

The map below shows the distance from Helmsley (B) to Ryedale Folk Museum (A).

               

A male Helmsley resident answered the questions below using the following words in the 1950s .  


Question: If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very... Answer(s): dry or thirsty

Question: What is left at the bottom of your teacup when you’ve finished drinking the tea? Answer: tea-leaves

Question: If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very... Answer: hungry

Question: What do you call something that you eat between meals? Answer: lowance

            Question: What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts? Answer: the headwark

Question: What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger? Answer: spell

Question: What do you call any running water smaller than a river? Answer: beck


He was a respondent who participated in the Survey of English Dialects.

His answers show a snap shot of some of the regional dialect words used in Helmsley over 60 years ago.


Coming next on Ryedale Folk Museum's blog: the results of the Dialect Questionnaire Project: Part 1.

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

The Dialect Questionnaire: The words

If you've taken part in the Dialect Questionnaire Project: here's a quick reminder.
If you didn't take part and you're interested in the project then just for fun: scroll down and think about which words you would use.
There are a list of multiple-choice answers for each question. There are no right or wrong answers. It is your opinion.

1. If you haven’t drunk anything for a long time, you will be very...
clammed up o  droughty o   dry o   gegged o   paddocked o   parched up o   thirsty o     other  o

2.  What is left at the bottom of your teacup after drinking your  tea?
dregs o grogs o tea-grains o tea-grounds o tea-leaves o tea-slops o monkeys o   slop o other o

3. If you haven’t eaten any food for a long time, you will be very...
clammed out o clammish o famished o famishing o gant o hungered o hungry o  pined o wallow o yap o other o

4. What do you call something that you eat between meals?
baggings o   bait  o   bit of a snack  o   bait of a snack  o   bite of ten-o’clock o    biting-on  o    minning-on  o    putting-on  o    clocks  o    croust  o    dowan  o    forenoon-drinkings  o    elevenses  o    lowance  o    lunch  o    packing  o    sandwiches o   snack  o    snap  o    sup-and-a-bite  o   ten-o’clocks  o    tenses  o   other o

            5. What do you say you’ve got when your head hurts?
a bad head o a big fat head o a sore head o a headache o a bit headwark o   a terrible headwark o sick head o sore head o the headache o   the headwark o   other o

6. What do you call a very small piece of wood that has got into your finger?
chip o pricker o shive o spale o speel o spelch o spelk o spell o spile o splice o   splint o splinter o spoal o stob o other o

7. What do you call any running water smaller than a river?
beck o brook o burn o dike o gill o gote o rivulet o sike o stell o stream o trench o  other o

Hopefully you've had fun thinking about your answers and learnt a few new words along the way!
Pop back and check out the results of the Dialect Questionnaire Project later this week.
Also, check out the words that a local resident of Ryedale would have used in the 1950s. Coming soon!

Monday, 21 May 2012

The Dialect Questionnaire at Ryedale Folk Museum


The Dialect Questionnaire is a student language project conducted at Ryedale Folk Museum in partnership with the University of Leeds Dialect Studies Course.

When and where? The project was located in the Manor House at Ryedale Folk Museum for 3 weeks from Tuesday 27 March to Wednesday 18 April 2012. Visitors were asked what words they would use for some common things - eg a stream, feeling hungry, having a headache etc.



What happened? 158 respondents completed the questionnaire. Thank you very much to everyone who took the time and effort to take part!

What happens next? The results of the questionnaire will be posted on this website. Please pop back and check out the results later this week!
If you missed it, this is what the project is all about: I am Christina Hughes, an English Language student at the University of Leeds. I am interested in mapping words to regions in England. My questionnaire focuses on the variety of words used for a range of concepts. The concepts are related to the Village Store, the Chemist, and the water course at Ryedale Folk Museum.



The questions and multiple-choice answers were adapted from the Survey of English Dialects. The survey was conducted in the 1950/60s and is the most comprehensive survey of dialects in England to date. 

Special thanks to those who made this project possible: Kevin Simms, David Stockdale and Emma Colclough at Ryedale Folk Museum and Dr. Fiona Douglas at the University of Leeds.

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Raku Firing at Ryedale Folk Museum


Take a look at local artist Wendy Greenwood Raku firing on site.





To Raku fire you put a glazed pot and take it up to 1000 degree C.
You then quench it in water or another combustable material.
Shown at the end of the film is a technique called Horse hair Raku, where you put the pot in the kiln until hot enough for the horse hair to melt into the pot and not just burn away.

Wendy is holding a few courses using the technique through the year for the museum:

Make &Fire Your Own Pot
Booked as a two session course Tues 5th June 1-3pm & Tues 19th June 12.30-3.30pm
Make and fire your own handmade pot using the traditional Raku Technique. A two session course split over two weeks to allow your pot to dry and be bisque before firing. In session one you will build your own pot and have a go at using the kick wheel, and in session two you will get to glaze and fire your pot to then take home!
£25 per person, includes all materials and entry to the museum

Glaze and Fire a Pot (pot provided)
Monday 6th August 12.30-2.30pm or 2.30-4.30pm
Choose from a selection of handmade pots to glaze and fire yourself, using the traditional Raku technique. While the kiln heats up learn about the history of Raku and pottery. At the end of the session have a one of a kind pot to take home with you.
£15 per person, inculdes all materials and entry to the museum

For further information, to see a full list of craft courses or to book on a course please contact the museum on 01751 417367 or

Monday, 7 May 2012

New Evening Talk Programme Begins

Our new evening programme begins with a talk on our current Gallery exhibition