Monday, 24 February 2014

Our Community in Photos

To celebrate our community here are some of our favourite photographs from our archive:


High Bridge, Rosedale Abbey 


Official opening of new bathing pool, Rosedale Head 1959


Hayes Family Portrait, Rosedale 1906


Farndale Silver Band, 1931


Procession, Low Farndale 


Playing on Ice, Rosedale Chimney Bank 1940

The Depots, Rosedale East

Monday, 17 February 2014

10 Reasons we Love our Location!

In the run up to Valentines day, we are sharing our top 10 reasons why we love our location! 


Reason Number 1 

Being within the beautiful Hutton Le Hole and the North York Moors National Park! (Image Chris J Parker NYMNPA)


Reason Number 2

Community celebrations, traditional village shows and fairs!


Reason Number 3

The unusual grazing residents!


Reason Number 4

The amazing nature & wildlife.


Reason Number 5

The amazing local crafts!


Reason Number 6

The amazing variation of coast, woodland,moors, and countryside! Just a short drive to The AONB: Howardian Hills, Dalby Forest, Scarborough and the North York Moors!

Reason Number 7 

The country pubs and breweries!


Reason Number 8 

The amazing locally hand made food! Everything from pies to chocolate!

Reason Number 9

The strong heritage in the area! With the wonderful Beck Isle Museum & the North Yorkshire Moors Railway just down the road.


Reason Number 10 

 The wonderful art festivals! Helmsley Arts Centre, Ryedale Book Festival, Yorkshire Cajun & many more! Cheering us up all year long!




Saturday, 8 February 2014

Valentines in History


As it is the month of Valentines we thought we would share with you some of the love themed objects from our Harrison Collection.

Pin Cushion - 1830s



A layered pin cushion, patterned with rose, shamrock and thistle designs.
It also has the words “May God Protect, Thy Mother Dear, And Thou Sweet Babe, Art Welcome Here”.
It was custom to put together a layette (a set of clothes and gifts for a newborn baby) with gifts like decorated pin cushions with patterns and verses.

Stay Busk - 1810s


Made of scrimshore or whale bone.
This stay busk has the drawing of a lady on a horse and a peeping tom; with an eye on top and the words ‘love to the’ heart.
These were carved by young men for girls as a love token. This one is believed to have been made by a sailor for his girlfriend. The stay busks or corset stay would be inserted in to the corset to give support.

Love Spoon - Mid 19th Century



A Welsh love spoon with carved motives of the heart, tears (to represent the soul,) and circles.
Parents would get the young male suitor to carve a love spoon to keep his hands busy.

Love Token - 1850’s



It is a knitting stick with a chain. It shows great skill of the carver as it has been made from one piece of wood. The hole would allow you to attach it to a belt and would also hold a kitting needle, so that the
knitter could use one hand or three needles.
This would have been given as a love token.

Knitting Sheath – 1686


Made of carved fruit wood, with the date 1686 carved into it.
This would have been given as a love token. It was used to attach to a belt and to hold a knitting needle so that the knitter could use one hand or three needles.
Only about ten similar knitting sheaths have survived from that period.

Rude Valentine - 19th Century



A valentine for the hated Victorian. This valentine shows a spider character with a verse which begins “like a wicked old spider...”.
Edward bought a lot of valentines in a batch in Hull.
“Rude” cards were also common in Victorian England.
  
Pincushion – 19th Century


This pincushion has the following words sewn into it: “Emblem of love from the retreat near York”. The retreat was an early mental hospital. Maybe this was made as a craft item and sold as a gift.

Stay Busk – Late 18th Century



Made of carved mahogany. It is decorated with tulips ‘two lips’, and hearts.
These were carved by young men for girls as a love token. This one is believed to have been made by a sailor for his girlfriend.
The stay busk or corset stay would be inserted in to the corset to give support. 

Comb – Late 15th to Early 16th Century


Made of carved boxwood with ivory panels and silk. Made in France, the decorative carvings include an arm with an arrow piercing a heat.
This would have been given as a love token. The comb was made with a saw called a stadder with two blades, one to cut and one to mark the next whole that needed to be cut.

Tuesday, 4 February 2014

First Gallery Exhibition Opening Soon!

We are excited to announce that the Ryedale Folk Museum's 2014 gallery programme opens in just over a week with Tim Parkin's exhibition - Elemental. With a series of stunning photographs from around the British Isles, Tim's photos are a study of our landscapes and nature's incredible colours and textures. 
For more info visit http://www.ryedalefolkmuseum.co.uk/art-gallery/